Physical Science- May 28-June 1

Semester Exam Review Packet:

  • Basic Chemistry & Electricity- Due Mon, May 28th
  • Magnetism & Waves- Due Tues, May 29th

Semester Exam: Thurs, May 31st

** Students must turn in BOTH the textbook and lab book the day of the exam.

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Physical Science- May 21-25

Topic: Waves

Classwork:
Analog vs. Digital Video & CER
Sound Waves Lab

Homework:
Students should be reviewing for the semester exam each day!
Waves Review (see below)- Due Wednesday, May 23rd

Semester Exam Review Packet:

  • Acids & Bases and Motion- Due Thurs, May 24th
  • Forces and Work, Energy & Simple Machines- Due Fri, May 25th
  • Basic Chemistry & Electricity- Due Mon, May 28th
  • Magnetism & Waves- Due Tues, May 29th

Test:
Waves Test- Wed, May 23rd

Waves Review
1. Define wave, frequency, wavelength, reflection, refraction
2. Draw a longitudinal wave. Label the following parts: wavelength, rarefraction, compression
3. Draw a transverse wave. Label the following parts: wavelength, crest, trough
4. How are frequency and wavelength related to one another?
5. Compare and contrast longitudinal and transverse waves.
6. Is sound a longitudinal or transverse wave?
7. Is light a longitudinal or transverse wave?
8. Why can’t sound waves travel in vacuum, but light waves can?
9. When a wave meets a boundary what can happen to it?
10. How is interference formed?
11. Differentiate between analog wave and digital technologies.

Physical Science- May 14-18

Topics: Electricity & Magnetism and Waves

Classwork:
Problem 7-9

Homework:
Reading ?’s 19.2– Due Mon, May 14th
Reading ?’s 21.1– Due Tues, May 15th
Electricity & Magnetism Review- Due Wed, May 16t
Reading ?’s 15.1– Due Thurs, May 17th

Test:
Electricity & Magnetism Test

Electricity & Magnetism Review

  1. Define current, voltage, potential difference, resistance, conduction, induction, insulator, conductor, circuit, static electricity
  2. Describe the three ways by which something can develop a charge.
  3. Describe what causes lightning to occur.
  4. Some materials in our battery lab allowed for current to flow, because they (held on tightly to their electrons or easily passed electrons).  These materials could be called (conductors or insulators.)
  5. When materials of a like charge meet, what occurs?
  6. When materials of opposite charges meet, what occurs?
  7. Describe what happened to make the salt “jump” when the balloon was rubbed across the acrylic plate
  8. When current flows, (electrons, protons, or neutrons) move.
  9. What is the equation for Ohm’s law?
  10. In a parallel circuit, (current or voltage) is divided amongst the branches of the circuit.  The same (current or voltage) travels through the whole circuit.
  11. In a series circuit, (current or voltage) is divided amongst the resistors.  The same (current or voltage) travels through the whole circuit.
  12. When resistors are connected in (parallel or series), the resistance for current to travel through the circuit drops.  Describe why this occurs.
  13. In a (parallel or series) circuit, there are many pathways for current.
  14. When resistors are connected in (parallel or series), the resistance is the addition of all the resistors, in addition to the resistance offered by the wire.
  15. Define a magnetic field and draw one.
  16. When magnetic field lines are close together and numerous, what does this indicate?
  17. Where is the magnetic field the strongest?
  18. How can an object become a temporary magnet?
  19. What are the differences between a temporary and a permanent magnet?
  20. How can a permanent magnet lose its magnetism?
  21. When a magnet’s south pole is brought near the south pole of another magnet, what occurs?  Draw the magnetic field lines representing this situation.
  22. When a magnet’s south pole is brought near the north pole of another magnet, what occurs?  Draw the magnetic field lines representing this situation.
  23. How can an electromagnet be created?
  24. How does the number of coils relate to the strength of an electromagnet?
  25. Compare electricity and magnetism.

Physical Science- April 23-27

Topic: Work, Energy, and Simple Machines & Electricity and Magnetism

Classwork:
Work, Energy, and Simple Machines Mastery Unit
– Level 10- Due Mon, April 23rd- by the end of class
– Level 12- Work and Energy Wkst- Due Tues, April 25th- by the end of class
Static Electricity Exit Ticket

Homework:
Level 11- Conservation of Energy Wkst- Due Tues, April 24th
Level 13- Work, Energy, & Simple Machines Review- Due Wed, April 25th

Test:
Work, Energy, & Simple Machines Test- Wed, April 25th

 

 

Physical Science- April 16-20

Topic: Work, Energy, & Simple Machines

Classwork:
Level 10- Problem 6-2- Due by end of class- Thurs, April 19th

Homework:
Level 9- Reading ?’s 13.1– Due Thurs, April 19th
Level 11- Conservation of Energy Worksheet- Due Fri, April 20th

Projects:
Level 7- Simple Machine Presentation- Due Tues, April 17th
Level 8- Nifty Lifting Machine- Due by end of class on Wed, April 18th

Physical Science- April 9-13

Topic: Work, Energy, and Simple Machines

Classwork:
Level 2- Due Monday, April 9th- by the end of class
Level 3- Due Tuesday, April 10th- by the end of class
Level 4- Due Wednesday, April 11th- by the end of class
Level 6- Due Friday, April 13th- by the end of class

Reading ?’s 12.2, Part I
Reading ?’s 13.1

 

Homework:
Level 5- Due Thursday, April 12th- by 8:00 AM
Reading ?’s 12.2, Part II

Projects:
Simple Machine Presentation- Due Tuesday, April 17th

Physical Science- March 19-23

Topic: Forces

Homework:
Forces Review- Due Fri, March 23rd
Additional homework will depend on student’s individual progress through the unit.

Projects:
Newton’s Second Law Lab Report (see requirements below)- Due Tues, March 20th
Newton’s Law Video Project (see requirements below)- Due Thurs, March 22nd

Test:
Forces Test- Fri, March 23rd

Forces Unit Packet Links:
Reading ?’s 10.1
Reading ?’s 10.2
Reading ?’s 10.3, Part I
Reading ?’s 10.3, Part II
Reading ?’s 10.4
Level 3 Website
Level 5 Website
Level 6 Website
Level 7 Website
Level 9 Website
Level 10 Website
Level 12 Video
Level 14 Website

 

What Influences Force?

Newton’s Second Law

Lab Report from Problem 5-2

40 points

Introduction: In paragraph form, define force and describe how it creates motion.  (Hint: use the answers to question 6 & 7 to help you.) (4 points)

Hypothesis:  (Write this statement with your idea to fill in the blank.)

If the force by which a cart is pulled increases, the distance it will travel, when released, _______________.  (1 point)

If the mass of a cart increases, the distance it will travel, when released from a constant force, __________. (1 point)

Procedure:  In a step-by-step format, write what you did to perform this laboratory.  This should be a description of steps 3 and 5 from Problem 5-2 in your own words and with the changes that were made to complete the experiments.  (8 points)

Data:  Table 5-1 and 5-2.  Be sure to label each table properly, making any changes that were made in the lab. (4 points)

Graphs: Two graphs should be created from the data from the two parts of the lab.  Be sure to label the x and y axes and title your graphs.  (8 points)

Conclusion:

-Address your hypotheses, using data from the lab to verify or falsify them. (4 points)

-Using data, describe the proportionally (directly or inversely) of the terms in this lab.  (How is distance related to mass?  How is force related to distance?)  (2 points)

-Related distance to the term discussed in Newton’s Second Law- acceleration.  (2 points)

-State Newton’s Second Law, in both words and an equation, and relate your data it, describing how your data demonstrates this law.  If it did not, discuss possible reasons as to why not.  (6 points)

Newton’s Laws Video Project

Forces Project

30 points

Summary:  Create a 3-5 minute film that demonstrates the application of Newton’s three laws in everyday life.   All the laws may be applied in a singular situation or different situations for each law may be used.

Things to consider:  Think about the situation before you film.  What scenes do you need to film or focus on as you film?   Discuss with those who will help you film.

Requirements:  This must be a live filming and may not be fully animated.  However, you may edit the film to add text or arrows.  You must be in the film, and your own voice must be explaining the law.

** A project that does not meet these requirements will be not be accepted.

The rubric will be applied for each of the three laws:

Missing Poor Average Excellent
Application of Newton’s Law(s) None of Newton’s laws are identified.

(0 points)

Incorrect application of Newton’s law.

(1 point)

An accurate application of Newton’s law is made, but not well explained. (2 points) An accurate and well-explained application of Newton’s law is made. (3 points)
Video Demonstration No video was made.

(0 points)

Video scenes are distracting or inappropriate.

(1 point)

Video scenes show the topic, but fail to clearly demonstrate all parts of Newton’s law(s) application.

(2 points)

Video scenes clearly demonstrate how Newton’s law(s) are applied.  (3 points)
Student Explanation

 

Student does not attempt an explanation of the law.

(0 point)

Student does not demonstrate understanding and/or has inaccurate information. (1-2 points) Student presents the project in a way that demonstrates general knowledge and understanding.

(3 points)

Present the project in a way that demonstrates through knowledge and understanding.

(4 points)